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ICC updates the code of conduct for player and DLS syatem

The International Cricket Council has made changes to the Code of Conduct and the playing conditions on Saturday (September 29), apart from updating the Duckworth-Lewis-Stern system.

Four new offences have also been introduced in the Code of Conduct for Players and Player Support Personnel. Any attempt made to gain an unfair advantage and a personal abuse will now be a Level 2 or a Level 3 offence. If a player disobeys an umpire's instruction or if there is an audible obscenity, it will be classified as a Level 1 offence.

The maximum sanction for a Level 3 offence which used to be eight suspension points has now been increased to 12, which will result in a ban for 12 ODIs or six Tests. Any Level 1, 2 or 3 charges will be heard by the match referee with a Judicial Commissioner only hearing Level 4 charges and the appeals.

Some minor changes have been made to the playing conditions in Tests and ODIs regarding the extra time provided in the five-day game and the timing of the interval in the 50-over format.

In Tests

11.7 Lunch or tea interval - 9 wickets down

For the lunch interval and for the tea interval

If either, 9 wickets are already down when 3 minutes remain to the scheduled time for the interval, or, the 9th wicket falls within this 3 minutes, or at any time up to and including the final ball of the over in progress at the scheduled time for the interval, then the provisions of clause 12.5.2 shall not apply and the interval will not be taken until the end of the over that is in progress 30 minutes after the originally agreed time for the interval, unless the players have cause to leave the field of play or the innings is completed earlier.

However, if at the conclusion of this additional 30 minutes, if a small number of runs are required to win the match, and both captains wish to continue playing in order to achieve a definite result, play will continue until either the match concludes or the players have cause to leave the field for any other reason.

For the purposes of this section of the Playing Conditions, the retirement of a batsman is not to be considered equivalent to the fall of a wicket.

12.8 Extra Time

12.8.1 At the End of the Day The umpires may decide to play 30 minutes (a minimum of 8 overs) extra time at the end of any day (other than the last day) if requested by either captain if, in the umpire's opinion, it would bring about a definite result on that day. This is in addition to the additional time provided for in clause 12.7.3. If the umpires do not believe a result can be achieved, no extra time shall be allowed.

If it is decided to play such extra time on one or more of these days, the whole period shall be played out even though the possibility of finishing the match may have disappeared before the full period has expired. If at the conclusion of this extra time, a small number of runs are required to win the match and both captains wish to continue playing in order to achieve a definite result on that day, play will continue until either the match concludes or the players have cause to leave the field for any other reason.

Only the actual amount of playing time up to the maximum 30 minutes extra time by which play is extended on any day shall be deducted from the total number of hours of play remaining, and the match shall end earlier on the final day by the amount of time by which play was previously extended under this clause.

12.8.2 At the Lunch or Tea Interval

The umpires may decide to extend play by 15 minutes (a minimum of four overs) at the scheduled lunch or tea interval of any day if requested by either captain if, in the umpires' opinion, it would bring about a definite result in that session. If the umpires do not believe a result can be achieved no extra time shall be allowed.

If it is decided to extend play, the whole period shall be played out even though the possibility of finishing the match may have disappeared before the full period has expired.

If at the conclusion of this extra time, a small number of runs are required to win the match and both captains wish to continue playing in order to achieve a definite result prior to the scheduled interval, play will continue until either the match concludes or the players have cause to leave the field for any other reason.

The following session of play shall be reduced by the amount of time by which play was previously extended under this clause.

12.8.3 For the avoidance of doubt, clause 11.7 shall still apply subsequent to the application of this clause, i.e when 9 wickets are down following the extra 15 minutes. However, this clause shall not apply when clause 11.7 has already been applied, i.e. the 15 minutes shall not be added at the end of 30 minutes extra time.

Earlier this year, players had to leave the field for the lunch break with India needing just two runs to win against South Africa in an ODI which invited plenty of criticism. This prompted a tweak to the existing law regarding the interval.

Clause 11.4 11.4.1 If the innings of the team batting first is completed prior to the scheduled time for the interval, the interval shall take place immediately and the innings of the team batting second will commence correspondingly earlier providing that this does not lead to an interval occurring more than 30 minutes prior to the scheduled interval.

11.4.2 If the innings of the team batting first is completed more than 30 minutes prior to the scheduled interval a 10-minute break will occur and the team batting second will commence its innings and the interval will occur as scheduled.

11.4.3 Where the innings of the side batting first is delayed or interrupted, the length of the interval will be reduced as follows:

11.4.3.1 If up to 15 minutes of actual playing time is lost (total playing time lost less any extra time provided), then the interval will be reduced by the amount of actual playing time lost.

11.4.3.2 If more than 15 minutes of actual playing time is lost (total playing time lost less any extra time provided), then the interval will be reduced to 30 minutes (subject to (iii) below).

11.4.3.3 Note: The prescribed interval timings above may be reduced further by the ICC Match Referee taking into account the intention of not having a prolonged interval after a lengthy interruption close to the conclusion of the innings of the team batting first. However, the minimum interval shall not be less than ten minutes.

11.4.4 If at the time of the scheduled interval, the team batting second has lost nine wickets or requires no more than 25 runs to win, play shall continue until a result has been achieved, unless the players otherwise have cause to leave the field of play.

In addition to clauses 11.4.3.1, 11.4.3.2 and 11.4.3.3 above, the length of the Interval may be reduced by the ICC Match Referee should exceptional circumstances arise.

Apart from these changes, ICC carried out an analysis of the scoring pattern over the last four years, taking 700 ODIs and 428 T20Is into account, in order to update the DLS method. With the par score in ODIs witnessing a rise, there will be a change in calculation of the score using the DLS method.

The ICC has taken into account the fact that teams have been able to bat in an aggressive manner for a prolonged period of overs and as a result, it will be assumed that more runs can be fetched towards the end of an innings.

All these changes will be effective from September 30, beginning with the first ODI between South Africa and Zimbabwe in Kimberley.


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